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Monday, March 29, 2010

Voices From The Quilts

On Saturday Tom and I spent a few hours in Ft. Scott, about 30 miles north of here.  We volunteered for a couple of hours at the Fort Scott National Historic Site during their Voices From The Quilts event.  It's been going on the entire month of March in honor of Women's History Month.  They had some amazing antique quilts on display. I took the following pictures and the descriptions are taken from the handouts available near each quilt.

This quilt belongs to my friend, Elaine. It was made about 1850 by her great-grandmother, Margaret Parks, when she was 25 years old.  She made the quilt in Ohio before her marriage in September 1854.  She and her four sisters each made one of these quilts.  The quilting is breathtaking...about 14 stitches per inch.  Vase designs are quilted in the corners, double line cross hatch on the sides and vine and grape designs surround a large central sunburst.  The quilting is stuffed , or "trapunto" and was done by inserting cotton stuffing between quilting lines through holes in the muslin backing.




I didn't get a handout for the next  quilt so I don't have any information.  I can tell you that the quilting was absolutely astounding!

Also  don't have the information on this one.  The stippling done by hand just takes your breath away!

(Edited on April 1 to add this information from Nancy Swanwick:
"The second set of pictures of the red and green quilt is actually one of mine, too. It was made in the late 1850s or early 1860s by Thressa (Pyle) Montgomery, my maternal grandfather's aunt. It was given to my grandparents when they married in 1915, then it came down the family to me in about 1990. I have happily loaned it to the fort for the first two "Voices From the Quilts". Our family calls it "Antique Poinsettia". ")







The pattern of this quilt is a possible variation of the "Egyptian Tulip" pattern. Quilting fills the white space between flowers and blocks.

Reel quilt designs include a basic concave square center with four arms in an oak or hickory leaf or simple oval shape. Reel quilts were popular for "album quilts" from the 1840's to 1850's.  There is an inscription in ink indicating ownership of this quilt in 1845.  This pattern has also been known as "Hickory Leaf", "Orange Peel" or "Rob Peter to Pay Paul".


This is the edge of a Rose of Sharon quilt pieced during the years 1837-1840.  The cloth was hand-dyed green and red and the spotted print in the green pattern was made by dipping a fork in brown paint.

Quilters weren't afraid to step out of the box even then!


This crazy quilt was purchased at an antique store. Little is known about the history of the quilt, though it is said to have been owned by a Fort Scott woman.  It features items unique to Fort Scott, including campaign ribbons, cigar bands and needlepoint.



We listened to three speakers while we were volunteering as hosts.  Terry Clothier Thompson  spoke and displayed Kansas Prairie Quilts

Then Tim Field presented "The U.S. Sanitary Commission and Their Quilts, the Soldier's Comfort". It was very interesting and you can learn more about this fascinating bit of quilt history here.


The third speaker was Kerin Hatch of Nevada. MO .  After 9/11/01 Kerin started  a project called "Quilted Hugs"  and began providing quilts for wounded soldiers.  Later she became involved  with Quilts of Valor and continues to make quilts for this worthwhile project.  She said she doesn't keep track of the number, but I suspect this caring quilter is responsible for hundreds of quilts.  The photo below shows her with one of her many creations.


It was truly an inspiring day! 

After we left the fort we checked out a vendor's mall and display of over 30 quilts by tremendously talented  Ft. Scott quilter.  I'll share pics of those quilts later this week so check back.

7 comments:

karenfae said...

I couldn't get any of the pictures to open on this post Mary - is it a problem on my end? I'm not having a problem with other pages.
Karen
http://karensquilting.com/blog/

Crispy said...

Wow these quilts are amazing, lucky you to be able to see them up close and personal. I can't imagine doing stippling by hand !!

Crispy

Kathie said...

beautiful, beautiful quilts oh how I wish I could have been there with you to see these quilts in person too
I love the tulip quilt
very interesting border would love to see more of it
and the second quilt picture/strawberry looking is just beautiful wow....can you tell me more? thanks!
kathie

Jacquie said...

Thanks for sharing the beautiful pics. The stories were so interesting - a very nice way to start my morning.

Sunna Reyr said...

Thanks for the show and tell, my favorite is the one with the giant strawberry or something. Love the colors in it.

momzilla said...

The second set of pictures of the red and white quilt is actually one of mine, too. It was made in the late 1850s or early 1860s by Thressa (Pyle) Montgomery, my maternal grandfather's aunt. It was given to my grandparents when they married in 1915, then it came down the family to me in about 1990. I have happily loaned it to the fort for the first two "Voices From the Quilts". Our family calls it "Antique Poinsettia".
Nancy Swanwick, Fort Scott

momzilla said...

I should have said red and green quilt---the one with the stippling.
Nancy